Lockjaw “Predatory Trails Of The Spirit” Album Review + Stream…

LOCKJAW

Predatory Trails Of The Spirit – Digital Download

Dark Drug Records – Released December 23, 2017

Reviewed by Ric “Suisyko” Dorr

 

Headquarters:
Milwaukee, WI

Previous Releases:
Goliath (2015)
Combat Ready (2014)
The Dirt Road To Inspiration (2013)
White Lies Black Heart (2012)
Dopamine Avenue (2011)
The Soundtrack To The End (2009)
11:11 (2007)
Starving For Salvation (2006)
Hell Inside (2005)
Dirty Minds and Smiling Faces (2004)
Looking Like A Devil (1998)

 

 

Review:

For the unknowing, this record is the 12th release from the dark recesses of HELLROCK HQ and is to date, THE best yet!! Eight tracks and 31+ minutes bringing forth further permeation of “Burnt Offerings” that are ever present in all things Lockjaw.

Featuring quite the pedigree of slots, ranging everywhere from stints with the likes of Mudvayne, Type O Negative, Damageplan, Wednesday 13, Hell Yeah, Prong, KMFDM, Powerman 5000 and Mindless Self Indulgence as well as Lords of Acid and Marilyn Manson. Using their self described weapons that include and are not limited to abrasive vocals, dark chord progressions and machine-gun electronics, Lockjaw is indeed stronger than ever in bringing the HELLROCK revolution into the minds of the masses.

The mind-behind, Medavon De Raj’e, is front and center and ready to take this to another level. The result is this collection of what could easily be listened to, in order, as a tale of ‘trails’ as the title suggests, that are crossed individually, one leading to the next. Coincidental or not, the effect of following along with each as they flow into the next ‘trail’.is that you naturally keep listening until the very end… almost like binge-watching an eight part series and it takes less than an hour to experience it all. And then you push play again, almost as if by an unconscious natural reflex, to take it in again…

Opening with “Blood Suckers”, three hits of a drumhead and we’re off with power chording and searing high notes layered over Medavon‘s signature sneer, saturated in that ‘knowing’ telling that allows easy comprehension, delivered with a clarity of enunciation that is missing from so many. ‘Make your move, and they suck your blood.’ Abso-fucking-lutely…

“Paralyzed” enters in a staggered electro tempo as you are reminded that ‘A picture is worth a thousand words’ as the flow starts, Medavon describes ‘Just like a sting, that hits you so hard… right in the back, I can hear it break… wave goodbye to your hopes and dreams, at least for today…  sacrificed, I’m paralyzed…’ and another ‘trail’ is engaged.

Live Band Pic

“The Scavengers” is the big standout on this one for me with the punch-in-the-face jump to full throttle with churning riffs to push you forward and even as ‘The flies think that I’m already dead, inside of this shell, sometimes, I am…’ and you can feel the breath on your flesh as you are enveloped by the tale of another even darker ‘trail’. And even as this one ends, “They Follow” is truly the next bend we have just gone around in this half-point and is filled with an ominous texture that swirls of shadows and mist as you follow closer to keep pace of the direction heading to reach the next turn.

“Burnt Offerings” greets you with an instrumental morsel that is exactly the kind that delivers with a plushness that lets you hear every word that is never spoken. Quick fade power-chord and “Absolution” enters with a slow progression with those synth loops and clear guitar notes, lightly salted with reverb to give that ghostly haunting lilt underneath those machine-gun, electro-tempo segments that only accent the post-punk grin that lives within ‘this psychosis’ described.

“In The Weeds” is another stand-out from this album for me in that I hear a touch of each previous Lockjaw album as these four minutes flow past with a perfect cadence and gave me a feeling of familiarity with each brushstroke of Medavon’s painting that is his mastery of composition, arrangement and mix that he has honed to razor sharp edges.

Pro Band Pic

Closer “Rescue” could seem like a departure from the rest of the record with it’s soft almost spaghetti western guitar line and slower paced tempo, even as the synths float up from underneath. As soon as that voice delivers the diatribe that is this final ‘trail’, it ties itself to each of the previous seven tracks and is the absolute perfect book-end to what could be described in spots as ‘stripped-down’ and in other spots as ‘thicker than ever’, but is FULL-ON Lockjaw in all it’s glory…

Having witnessed them onstage multiple times, as well as having seen the rotating legion of members that deliver it live, from Jose and his solo’s to Baldii and his rhythm lines to Lowviolet‘s bass assault, all I can tell you is you simply MUST see them for the completion of your immersion into the world of HELLROCK, whether this is your first experience or the most recent of many!! Medavon and his compatriots deliver 200%…  EVERY TIME…

Share this album with every set of ears around you, support them live and as always, keep it LOUD!!

Additional Links:
https://store.cdbaby.com/all/medavon
https://www.facebook.com/darkdrugrecords/

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New Album Review – Ebisu “Lure”

EBISU-  Lure

Release date: February 07th, 2017

Label – Self Released. Format: DD

New York is the home for this band that Ken Ghani (vox/guitars), Nikhil Kamineni (guitars/bass/synths/noise) and Tama Vadja (drums) have procured to give this epic 3-track EP to us and this is indeed something special.

A not so subtle mix of elements of post-apocalyptica/ambient/doom/industrial with a splash of stoner thrown in for good measure, Ghani / Kamineni have created a soundscape of shadows and whispers and foreboding that as ‘Sycamore’, the opener, fades in, you can feel the fog swirling as you advance with caution into the quagmire of what awaits next. Full-instrumental here that sets the tone for the remaining two tracks as the sounds that surround you seem to wrap tighter and tighter as you approach ‘The Merchant’ that is waiting in front of you and greets you with an almost tantric sounding drone-chant. Once the first hit of the snare rings out, the whisper-screams float by your ear and the droning repeats and repeats lending to the feeling of mystic capture that permeates and then seems to dissipate for the fade out of the song. ‘Good At Craft’ comes in with a lone guitar progression followed by more ambient noises closing in again from all sides, slowly closing in. The same whisper-vocal weaves around like so many snakes, the power chords giving them body to strike as you abandon to the enveloping you feel closing around like a black velvet glove that is getting firmer in its grasp of plush control, accentuated by the increased intricacy of the music that rings of almost divine splendor in that same plushness as EBISU drive you from where you stand to the multi-dimensional planes from which they have brought forth this musical mastery.

 

Band Shot

 

Amazing mix with solid production values give this release the power to crush and if this is the future of ambient-sludge -goth-doom hybrids, I say BRING ME MORE because three tracks just isn’t enough…

Words by Ric “Suisyko” Dorr


Album Review – A Projection “Framework”

A Projection

Framework – Vinyl / CD / DD

Tapete Records – Released January 13th, 2017

 

I’d been telling Taste Nation brainchild Matthew Thomas that I needed some good new post-punk in my life.  Believe it or not, I don’t just sit around listening to stoner metal, doom, and all the old Black Sabbath albums all the time.  I actually have fairly eclectic tastes, and I start to feel pretty burned out listening to one genre of music all the time.  I beg and practically whine to be able to review someone who doesn’t list Kyuss or Sleep as influences, and eventually Matthew was kind enough to oblige.  Okay, maybe not initially, when he tricked me into reviewing another stoner metal band by telling me it was a post-punk band, but I’m willing to forgive him that little bait and switch tactic, because it was a good stoner album, and the next band that landed on my proverbial desk was Sweden’s A Projection.  Matthew basically asked me, “Is this post-punk enough for you yet??”  And I answered with a resounding YES, then proceeded to bombard his Facebook page with cute pictures of kittens as a show of gratitude, for which you’d think that he’d be far more appreciative.

 

Band Pic

 

From the opening bassline from first track, ‘Hands’, which creeps and crawls through the brain like some long-lost Joy Division outtake that’s just resurfaced circa 2017, you pretty much know what you’re getting into: frenetic, restless and infectious basslines, drumbeats that pulse with a steady, hypnotic monotony, cold baritone vocals delivering bleak lyrics and minimalistic melodies, soaring synthesizer parts, and guitars that toe the line between lush ambiance and abrasive angularity.  The second track, ‘Dark City’, follows suit quite nicely, with a catchy instrumental hook that’s reminiscent of the classic Joy Division tune, “24 Hours”, though A Projection definitely ups their early Cure influence on this one.  This tune for me represents the peak of what they can accomplish with the whole  Joy Division exchanging bloody kisses and  black roses with The Cure approach, so I think that it’s cool that they change things up by the third song, “Transition”.  The memorable line “No more singing on the dance floor” is reinforced with the more dance friendly beat and song structure, and it marks a turn towards the more upbeat, which continues on the next track “Sensible Ends”, with its curt vocal delivery and driving drum rhythms that eventually morph into a straight up four-to-the-floor dance beat.

The next track, ‘Scattered’, is where they really start to shake things up a bit.  A Projection utilizes a two chord major key progression that’s eerily reminiscent of the Modern English song “I’ll Melt With You.”  There’s also a really cool and quirky keyboard breakdown thrown into the middle before the vocals break out of the baritone range into more ecstatic octaves.  In case you think that they’re going soft on us, rest assured that the next song ‘I’m Not Here’ once again launches into  a dark and emotionally tortured dalliance, like Ian Curtis providing guest vocals for a Disintegration outtake.  This is followed by ‘No Light’, which is more in the same vein of the second song, “Dark City.”  Just read the above description of that track; it’s the same idea.

‘Next Time’ once again strays into pop territories, with a ridiculously infectious main hook initially introduced by the guitars and then driven home by the catchy chorus.  I swear that I’ve heard this hook in another prominent 80’s tune, though I can’t place it off the top of my head.  The ending of the song is great too, as it descends into this ranting style of vocals, like a goth-rock take on R.E.M.’s 

‘It’s The End Of The World As We Know It (I Feel Fine).’  The next song, ‘For Another Day’, once again reminds me of early Cure, which is fine and dandy. ‘Betrayal’ is next, and once again brings that major key melodic sense to the table, and the quicker tempo gives it an irresistible urgency.  ‘Hollow Eyes’ is slower and bleaker, with a more dissonant, eerie progression and some harsh triggered electronics in the background, along with a splendid descending keyboard line after the chorus.  ‘Breach’ is in the same realm as “Dark Cities”, right down to the main guitar part that reminds me of “24 Hours.”  The final track, ‘Listen To The Dark’ once again makes heavy use of electronics and effects – the drums and vocals are punctuated by heavy delay, which stretches out the otherwise sparse arrangement into a dark abstract soundscape that recalls some of The Soft Moon’s best work.  This would have been a goth anthem were it only released in 1983.

 

Framework_Album Cover

 

I’m sure that you know what you’re thinking right now – I started this review by saying that I was burned out only listening to bands that sound a lot like other bands, and yet here I am reviewing a band that by my own account, simply sounds a lot like other bands.  This is absolutely true; I’m guilty as charged.  A Projection aren’t bravely treading new ground, nor do they really attempt to do so.  This is an album made solely in the post-punk/goth/new wave tradition of the early 80’s.  I’m not going to lie to you or insult your intelligence  by saying that this album is the greatest thing since sliced bread and you must be living under a rock if you haven’t heard it.  It’s just a well written collection of thirteen songs that are executed, performed, and produced to accomplish a particular effect, namely to conjure the spirit of a bygone age of music past.  Right now, that’s simply scratching a particular itch that’s been nagging at my backside for the past couple weeks, plain and simple.  If this albums sounds like it scratches your particular itch as well, then I’d encourage you to check it out for yourself.  If this doesn’t sound like your cup of tea, and you’re looking to drink down something more in the mode of a 70’s rock throwback, the new Horisont album is most excellent in my humble opinion.

Reviewed by Andy “Darkwave Duck” Beresky