DERELICS – “Guilty of Being Young” Album Review + Track Stream

DERELICS

Guilty Of Being Young – Digital Download

Self Released – Early September, 2017

Reviewed by Ric “Suisyko” Dorr

 

FoundedOct 11, 2011

LocationLondon England

Band Members:
Rich – Drums
Josh – Bass (Thom on our EP)
Reno – Guitars/Vocals
Mushroom man – Producer/spiritual counseling

Previous Releases – “Introducing” 2015 / “Speaking Without Words (Bicycle Jams)” 2016

Three guys make up the line up here. Having faced numerous personnel changes and almost four years from founding to first release, DERELICS is serious about their craft and this new EP, “Guilty of Being Young,” delivers even more than what we have come to expect. They describe themselves as “technicolor/heavy/psychedelic rock” and this is pretty spot-on.  This album was recorded with Wayne Adams at Bear Bites Horse (Shitwife, Vodun, Luminous Bodies).

 

Band Pic

 

Three tracks clocking in at just over 19 minutes on this release and each track is as strong as the other two in ALL instances. From the screamo-feel of ‘The (Wicked) Witch Is Dead’ complete with the meandering soloing, to the staggered, jazzy feel of the drum intro to ‘Guilty Of Being Young’ through ‘The Summer Song.’   There is a more driving energy and vibe that permeates this release that seems to have replaced the ‘doom’ feel that seemed prevalent with the previous releases.

Hopefully, this line-up is solid and they can push out a full-length sooner than later and can bring their circus to our shores in America!!  The Guys have released the Title Track single ‘Guilty of Being Young’ on their Bandcamp Page for stream and purchase (below).  Buy the entire EP immediately when it is released.  Play it for everybody you think may like it and even those you know will hate it.   Support them live if you are given the opportunity and remember to always keep it LOUD!!


SAUTRUS – “Anthony Hill” Album Review & Video Feature…

SAUTRUS

Anthony Hill – Vinyl // CD // DD

Pink Tank Records – Release Date:  May 2017

Reviewed by Ric “Suisyko” Dorr

 

Band Members: Weno Winter- Vocals / Michał Nowak- Guitar /

Piotr ‘Ochota’ Ochociński- Drums / Michał Młyniec – Bass

From: North Poland

Formed: 2010

Previous Releases: “Kuelmaggah Mysticism” EP (2012) / “Reed: Chapter 1” (2014)

SAUTRUS describe themselves as a ‘heavily tuned psych-rock band skillfully combining elements of 60’s rock with contemporary metal creating a completely mind blowing sound’. Bringing everything to the table and then some is how I read that and believe me, they have done just that with this latest offering. From harmonica to throat-singing, they have not left a lot out of the frying pan here and each flavor adds to each of the seven tracks served up and you can tell from the outset that this is not some new group of guys trying to find their way, but are indeed seasoned musicians that have spent their time honing their identity from endless rehearsals to studio time to sharing the stages with a vast array including acts ranging from URIAH HEEP to SAMSARA BLUES EXPERIMENT and beyond.

Live band pic

Forty one minutes in length, opener ‘The Way’ sets a great pace for this album with so many different segments strung seamlessly together for the entire seven minutes plus. ‘Good Mourning’ starts with a smoky blues harp intro before the rest of the band kicks in and punches you right in the chest with one of those tempos that pulls you along like a train and you can’t help but reach out and turn up to ‘still not loud enough’!! That harmonica keeps it’s hold on your head as the band shows a solidity of form that had been hinted at with previous tracks but not realized until this album. ‘The Fungus’ comes right out with a jazz-swing tempo that makes you sway until the SABBATH sounding body of the song really begins and you can almost taste the smoke in the air as the bass rumbles your walls throughout this stoner/sludge epic feeds the need for exactly this, something so solid and dripping in the energy of pure music, even as it fades off to the PURE psych ‘Cats On The Fence’ that drips of a HANS KERSHI style vocal amid the loopy science-fiction frequency bounces showing yet another side that we may not have exactly expected but have to smile with none the less.

‘Synopticon’ wastes zero time in stepping up as a pummeler with a driving run up and down the necks of the stringed instruments and multi-layered vocals swirling as so many embers glowing in their combined dance through the air surrounding you, even as each step follows this tale unfolding with the passion pushed into this tortured mic “To survive, survive…” The break at 5 minutes is right on time, letting you grab a deep breathe as the guitars scream to and against each other until the cymbal run picks it back up to resume the run to the end, staying up front to catch each note and word given. ‘Shotgun’ is the perfect shifting of gears and right away, you are moving along. Complex and savory, the flavor is dark and heavy as you can want it and when that vocal hits, full forward is the only way to travel alongside. So many elements perfectly combined to create what I would hope is a staple of SAUTRUS’ live set that a crowd would have zero options but to whip it up to full frenzy as these guys hammer away showing a mastery of their craft with a musicianship that is lacking with so many.

Pro band Shot

Closer ‘When The War Is Over’ is amazing in it’s acoustic simplicity after the previous six tracks, each showing a complexity of their own and if I didn’t know, I would swear was indeed H. Kirsh doing a new BLIND GUARDIAN song. Perfect cap on an amazing release. BUY it the second you can get it and support them if you are lucky enough to have them in your area!!


Ecstatic Vision – New Album Review & Stream “Raw Rock Fury”

Ecstatic Vision

Raw Rock Fury – Vinyl // CD // DD

Relapse Records – April 7th, 2017

Reviewed By Andy “Dinger” Beresky

 

This is the second time in recent weeks that I’ve had to be extremely critical of a band that I truly like.  If you read my review of Ecstatic Vision’s debut, you’ll remember that I really liked their sound, thought it was a really promising debut, and was fairly nonplussed by the banality of the lyrics.  They were for the most part extremely pot-centric, and lacked any real depth or sense of subversion.  I like subversion in art, I think it’s a really vital and overlooked element to a successful artistic statement.

At this point in time, I feel like there are two distinct schools on how to be a band: one school just gets their asses on the road, plays as killer of a live show as they can day in and day out, and sells as much merchandise as humanly possible to support their efforts.  They put all of their energy into the stage each night.  Their records are made in an effort to capture some of that live show and establish an ongoing connection with the fans who have experienced them live.  Ecstatic Vision seems to fall firmly into this first camp.

The second school is composed of musicians who take their time with songwriting and recording, and are more concerned with making records that actualize their artistic impulses.  They play live sporadically, when they can, though it’s not really their focus.  The album itself is the ultimate art form and personal statement.  I’m someone who falls firmly into this second camp.

 

live pic of band

 

It’s worth saying that most of the best bands of past and present can do both, though it’s a rare commodity in this day and age, with the way that the modern music industry works.  I think that it’s vitally important for bands to attempt to bridge the gap – bands that make amazing studio albums should make an attempt to translate that into a live setting, and bands that that are awesome live need to learn the nuances of songwriting and the studio.  There are obviously some serious growing pains involved in this process, and part of that process involves the ability to take criticism and evolve accordingly.  The responsibility to offer this criticism lies mostly with the fans, though there are those of us who are fortunate enough to have our thoughts published.  I happen to find myself in this position, and we do bands and fans a disservice by not offering up our most authentic selves in succumbing to hype and the pressure of PR companies.

You want to talk about fake news??  The music industry is 90% fake news, maybe more.  Putting forth our honest, authentic and thoughtful reflections on an album is largely a lost art.   You’ll see reviewers saying things like “If you haven’t heard this album, you’re living under a rock, people.” No.  Fuck you.  That’s blatantly manipulative.  Lots of people cannot hear or not like a release for a wide variety of reasons, and they are entitled to their opinions and their dismissiveness.  Those of us who have some sort of audience for our opinions, given our positions of power, it’s up to us to respect the tastes and opinions of others.  If you think that I live under a rock because I don’t worship an album that you do, fuck you.  Seriously, fuck you. Own your fucking opinion as just that – you’re not the do all and end all.  You’re one small person with questionable tastes and an asserted opinion, in a veritable ocean of people with tastes and opinions. What I say about Raw Rock Fury is simply my opinion, take it or leave it.  Any reviewer who asserts otherwise, you should rightly tell them to fuck off.  Your opinion is just as important as mine, if not more so.  People just publish my opinion, because I feel empowered to speak it.  You should feel equally empowered.  Seriously.  If you’re passionate and articulate enough, someone will publish you.  That’s my high dream, that every one of you that reads this review goes out and writes their own. Your opinion is vitally important, and anyone who tells you otherwise is a shitbag.

 

Promo Kit_Relapse

 

With all that said….

From my perspective, when a band releases a promising debut, the natural next step is to write a stellar sophomore album.  That’s the make or break point for me.  From where I stand, Ecstatic Vision have not delivered a knockout punch with their second album.  Quite the opposite.  I’m trying to think about how I can best express this.

I went to the movies with a good friend yesterday.  We were both making comments about action movies and how banal they’ve become, how they lack substance, how directors have forsaken the art of pacing, and how these movies just rely on special effects and vapid over stimulation.  Then we talked about how Hollywood science fiction movies are now basically constructed around a decent sci-fi concept that rapidly descends into a mindless action movie.  See above for how that turns out.  Still, people love that shit.  It’s not for me.  Have you ever seen 2001: A Spacey Oddity?? Do you still even have the attention span to watch it again? Do it, as a personal favor to me, not that I’m deserving.  Do it for yourself then.  It can’t hurt. Maybe you can’t do it.  That’s sad.

Watch how there’s just a goddamn blank black screen with some of the most iconic film scoring of all time for the first five minutes.  That’s it.  Watch how slow and deliberate every single scene is revealed to us.  It gives you time to think about what’s really happening, and more importantly, about the implications of what’s really happening, and what’s going to happen next.  Then think about the conclusion, how ridiculous of a psychedelic, sensuous delight that we’re treated to!! Think about how climactic of an ending that is, and how it contrasts with the deliberate pacing of the beginning.

 

Band Pic

 

It’s like sex; all good art should be like good sex.  Seriously.  That’s why sex is so awesome.  Great songs should be like great sex. Granted, there’s different kinds of songs, and different kinds of sex.  Some sex is extremely one dimensional.  This album is extremely one dimensional.

Ecstatic Vision’s music certainly has a primal, sexual appeal.  That’s what I liked about their debut.  It’s like that first time you hook up with someone, and you’re thinking, “Damn….that was pretty good, things are just going to get better from here.”  After you hang out with this particularly special person and discuss it a bit, the next time y’all are together, they just bombard you with the most climactic techniques of your last encounter, rather than exploring the subtleties.  The sex doesn’t turn out better; they’ve forgotten about the pacing and dynamics that made your first encounter so special, yet they think that they’re the shit when it comes to matters that happen between the sheets.  They’re missing the point.  I’m not going to expound on what that point is, because I trust that every one of you reading this has had a similar experience.  Perhaps I’m wrong.  I’m often wrong.  If you haven’t experienced this, seriously….get yourself out more.

This is what their record company says about the album:   “ ‘Raw Rock Fury’ is a raucous mix of troglodyte Detroit rock, soothing Krautian moto, filthy Beefheartian blues, and Hawkwindian primal world heavy psych!”  I’m not going to disagree with any of this, it’s all true.  It’s true in the same sense that Obi-Wan tells Luke that he didn’t lie to him because his spin on the whole Anakin/Vader situation was that he’d told him the truth, from a certain point of view.  A record company’s point of view is based around selling records.  I’ve told you what my point of view is, and I’m not even completely sure what it’s based around.  Reconcile the two accounts of the album.  Then, most importantly, take it in from your own point of view, and form your own conclusions.