Nihilosaur “Hymn & Ruin” Album Review + Stream…

NIHILOSAUR

Hymn & Ruin – Digital Download

Independent – Released July 1, 2017

Reviewed by Mike Hackenschmidt

 

Line Up:
Florian Analfox / Voices, Bass
Felix Geniusfix / Guitars, Samples
Tiwo Meiz / Drums

Review:

From the nether regions of Poland, Nihilosaur return with their 3rd full length album entitled “Hymn & Ruin”. Nihilosaur has a unique sound. I don’t feel that music needs to be categorized but it’s a lot easier to describe a band by their genre. Usually when I don’t know how to classify a band I’ll hit the net and check the usual places. Wikipedia is my go to but Wikipedia never heard of Nihilosaur. My next stop is Encyclopedia Metallum who list Nihilosaur as “Death Metal / Hardcore”. Even the shortest of listens leads me to believe that what they actually meant when they said “Death Metal / Hardcore” was “we don’t know”. Off to Nihilosaur’s Facebook page where they list their Genre as “Hymn and Ruin”…. That’s not a fucking genre. That’s the album title. I assume what they mean when they say their genre is “Hymn and Ruin” is “We don’t care”. I don’t think we can lump them into any category.

With that in mind, I think the best way to describe Nihilosaur’s sound is by conjuring up an image in your mind of the Nihilosaur itself. What would that be? First, the Nihilosaur is ancient & long dead but reanimated, presumably by some toxic waste and a few shots of lightning though no one knows for sure. Some of the Nihilosaur’s flesh was preserved in the tar pits from whence it came while some places the flesh is rotten, even decomposed to the bone. Its movements are slow. Despite having emerged from the pits a decade ago, tar is stuck to the Nihilosaur’s exterior. Flowing like molasses off its body with each movement, despite leaving a trail behind there seems to be no end to the muck. Nihilosaur is large, carnivorous and hungry – but not evil. No. Nihilosaur will devour you with indifference; not malevolence. He’s also horny as fuck.

Let’s see if we can complete the metaphor as we tour through the album. Starting with the cover, the analogy breaks down but let’s ignore that for just a minute. We’ve got a comic book style cover with an upright elephant with multiple arms, its trunk rammed into its gut. I guess it’s eating itself? I’m not really sure. The lettering of the band name looks eerily familiar and I’ll kick myself when I figure out where it’s from. Hopefully you’re reading this and yelling it at your screen, maybe I’ll hear you. Anyway, I have no clue on the significance of the elephant. Maybe it’s some sort of Nihilist symbolism though that’s a complete nonsense thought.

The album opens with a track called “No, No, No”. The heavily distorted guitars start the number, giving us a clue as to what comes next. The drums and bass of join the fray filling out a thick doom sound. Slow, melodic, distorted voices start creating eerie, ancient doom. They soon give way to death voices but quickly return to eerie again. Unfortunately none of the voices are discernible so I have no idea what this song is about. I agreed to review this album based on the band name alone (it’s so clever!!) and was hoping to hear what these guys have to say. The incomprehensible voices are a theme throughout the album. In fact the voices are turned down so they don’t stand out but rather blend in with the music. I suppose this is why the band calls them voices as opposed to vocals. It does suit the sound.

Moving on track to track, we have an atmosphere of thick goo. Imagine your lungs filling with tar. How they achieve such density with a 3 piece is beyond me. I would guess it has something to do with the heavy distortion and the blending of the voices which throughout the album go from eerie to death vocals to deep chants to low rumblings to screams.

Bimp Picture

Song titles like “A Kiss is the Beginning of Cannibalism” and “A Bag of Bones” tell me the Nihilosaur is hungry…or perhaps he was. After all, it’s not a bag of drumsticks, it’s “A Bag of Bones”. Song titles like “Night is My Nudity” and “What Are You Doing After the Orgy?” tell me he’s horny… but then again, if “A Kiss is the Beginning of Cannibalism” then he’s probably planning on working up an appetite during the orgy. Don’t go anywhere alone with the Nihilosaur unless you want to be dinner.

The album closes out with a track called “Reptile Parthenogenesis”. If you’re not aware, parthenogenesis is when an animal impregnates itself. Get ready for there to be many little Nihilosaurs running around having orgies and devouring whatever’s in their path. (Edit note: after writing this paragraph and submitting this review, I woke up in the middle of the night and realized what the elephant is doing to itself on the album cover… a little parthenogenesis action!!!).

Seriously though, it’s hard to take a band seriously when their members have names like Analfox and Geniusfix. I have to assume that they don’t take themselves too seriously either. That’s a trait I think is very admirable in music and musicians. It’s supposed to be fun. Grab a copy of Hymn and Ruin, give it a listen and have a good time.

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SAUTRUS – “Anthony Hill” Album Review & Video Feature…

SAUTRUS

Anthony Hill – Vinyl // CD // DD

Pink Tank Records – Release Date:  May 2017

Reviewed by Ric “Suisyko” Dorr

 

Band Members: Weno Winter- Vocals / Michał Nowak- Guitar /

Piotr ‘Ochota’ Ochociński- Drums / Michał Młyniec – Bass

From: North Poland

Formed: 2010

Previous Releases: “Kuelmaggah Mysticism” EP (2012) / “Reed: Chapter 1” (2014)

SAUTRUS describe themselves as a ‘heavily tuned psych-rock band skillfully combining elements of 60’s rock with contemporary metal creating a completely mind blowing sound’. Bringing everything to the table and then some is how I read that and believe me, they have done just that with this latest offering. From harmonica to throat-singing, they have not left a lot out of the frying pan here and each flavor adds to each of the seven tracks served up and you can tell from the outset that this is not some new group of guys trying to find their way, but are indeed seasoned musicians that have spent their time honing their identity from endless rehearsals to studio time to sharing the stages with a vast array including acts ranging from URIAH HEEP to SAMSARA BLUES EXPERIMENT and beyond.

Live band pic

Forty one minutes in length, opener ‘The Way’ sets a great pace for this album with so many different segments strung seamlessly together for the entire seven minutes plus. ‘Good Mourning’ starts with a smoky blues harp intro before the rest of the band kicks in and punches you right in the chest with one of those tempos that pulls you along like a train and you can’t help but reach out and turn up to ‘still not loud enough’!! That harmonica keeps it’s hold on your head as the band shows a solidity of form that had been hinted at with previous tracks but not realized until this album. ‘The Fungus’ comes right out with a jazz-swing tempo that makes you sway until the SABBATH sounding body of the song really begins and you can almost taste the smoke in the air as the bass rumbles your walls throughout this stoner/sludge epic feeds the need for exactly this, something so solid and dripping in the energy of pure music, even as it fades off to the PURE psych ‘Cats On The Fence’ that drips of a HANS KERSHI style vocal amid the loopy science-fiction frequency bounces showing yet another side that we may not have exactly expected but have to smile with none the less.

‘Synopticon’ wastes zero time in stepping up as a pummeler with a driving run up and down the necks of the stringed instruments and multi-layered vocals swirling as so many embers glowing in their combined dance through the air surrounding you, even as each step follows this tale unfolding with the passion pushed into this tortured mic “To survive, survive…” The break at 5 minutes is right on time, letting you grab a deep breathe as the guitars scream to and against each other until the cymbal run picks it back up to resume the run to the end, staying up front to catch each note and word given. ‘Shotgun’ is the perfect shifting of gears and right away, you are moving along. Complex and savory, the flavor is dark and heavy as you can want it and when that vocal hits, full forward is the only way to travel alongside. So many elements perfectly combined to create what I would hope is a staple of SAUTRUS’ live set that a crowd would have zero options but to whip it up to full frenzy as these guys hammer away showing a mastery of their craft with a musicianship that is lacking with so many.

Pro band Shot

Closer ‘When The War Is Over’ is amazing in it’s acoustic simplicity after the previous six tracks, each showing a complexity of their own and if I didn’t know, I would swear was indeed H. Kirsh doing a new BLIND GUARDIAN song. Perfect cap on an amazing release. BUY it the second you can get it and support them if you are lucky enough to have them in your area!!


Album Review – DOPELORD “Children Of The Haze”

DOPELORD

Children Of The Haze

Independent – released January 16, 2017

Warsaw Poland is where this bearded foursome hail from, bringing forth a 6-track masterpiece of doom/stoner metal with this, their third official release. Citing “old movies, 70’s music and magical herbs’ as their main influences, it makes sense that they ‘tune low and play slow’ as they follow their strict regimen of ‘smoking, rehearsing and touring.” If that is what it takes to get to this point, roll on gentlemen!!

 

Band in front of Amps

 

Opener ‘Navigator’ is the perfect start to this album with the lone guitar and enough slow-decay delay to carry you until the first rumble of ultra low bass and cymbals take over. For the next minute plus, you feel it creeping into your veins as your eyes close without resistance, waiting for that moment when you hear “Leaf burns to ashes, inhale the holy smoke…” and a grin takes over as you understand. ‘Skulls and Candles’ is even slower in tempo, and is suiting to the tale being told. Love the tone of the guitar solo that takes you to the end, perfectly faded in saturated delay.

‘Scum Priest’ shows the shared love for old movies with the inserted dialogue including “The evil is real, may God have mercy on us” and the crushing assault splits you between the eyes as DOPELORD has shown they love to do, this time with a fury glowing brighter than ever before. ‘Reptile Sun’ is another crusher with a faster pace than usual and you can’t help but to get moving in time.

Two of the tracks stood out to me as incredible and I couldn’t decide which was more of a favorite. ‘Dead Inside (I & II)’ is the quintessential stoner float-along song with their signature ‘low and slow’ pace that carries you to the edges of the picture of lyrics delivered to you with an open hand. When the second part of this tome hits, you are ready for the bass/guitar pummeling that is about to be delivered, feet hitting the ground running. The title track ‘Children Of The Haze’, is near perfection that almost broke my sternum it hit me so hard just HOW definitive this particular composition is of one of the finest moments from DOPELORD… so far. “Dancing madly” absolutely describes how my heartbeat shifted with the flow of this opus.

As the last note faded out, I was stunned at how impressed I was, having been drawn in completely and I am SO looking forward to DOPELORD bringing it live to our shores this year. GOTTA get this one if you don’t have it!!

Words by Ric “Sui-Syko” Dorr

 


Album Review – Sunnata “ZORYA”

Sunnata

Zorya – Vinyl / CD / DD

Self Released – April 11, 2016

 

This is the second full length from the Polish doom outfit, Sunnata.  While in full disclosure, I haven’t actually heard their debut, Zorya is certainly a breath of fresh air from what I usually hear from more modern “doom.”  I hear lots of bands who hear Sleep’s Dopesmoker for the first time, get really high, tune down to G flat, play really slow and think that’s the essence of “doom.”  I hear other bands that take the retro route, and just try to ape the vibe of the first four Black Sabbath albums.  I suppose that’s all well and good, and not particularly awful places to start off in the overall development of a band, though too often it turns into either a bit of a pitfall or a total dead end.  Fortunately, Sunnata don’t fall into this trap.  I personally like to hear bands that are interested in growth, development, experimentation, and bringing other influences into the fold.

This album doesn’t disappoint in any of those departments – it consistently surprised me with the various musical twists and turns, sometimes within the course of the same song, like the lengthy opener, “Beasts Of Prey.”  It starts in a fashion that’s fairly typical of more contemporary doom, with a droning guitar chord and subsequent feedback, while the bass lays down a groovy, slow, slug wading through molasses intro riff.  Soon enough, the guitars join in full force, building the bassline into a mighty wall of dark distortion.  Twice it peaks with a more chiming, repetitive chord, before settling into a more mid-paced and punishing variation of the opening riff four minutes into the track.  From there it cleans things up, with mellow, swirling psychedelic guitars and ethereal vocals delivered in the form of a mantra.  Once things hit full throttle, it seems like there are two vocalists, one delivering a slightly more intense dreaminess, and the other offering a scream/throaty growl in counterpoint.  It’s little juxtapositions like these that make Sunnata’s sound so effective, and it’s what makes them stand out in the crowded stoner doom crowd.

 

Band Live Shot

 

There’s a cool little guitar solo that kicks in – it sounds like slide guitar run through tons of delay, and it builds up the tension quite nicely with its mixture of melody and sheer mind searing noisiness. Nine minutes in, we see the temp once again shift into the faster “doom” realms where bands like High On Fire often find themselves.  The guitars and drums blur more and more into faster, most melodic terrain, eventually taking on a slightly “blackened” timbre with the vocals and tremolo style riffs, before it suddenly peaks and ends.  Wow, what an opener; it’s definitely the album’s highlight for me.  The second song, “Zorya”, is no slouch by any means, though it is a little more conventional, beginning with the disembodied vocals posing the perpetual question, “Have you ever spread your wings to fly?”  Only in my dreams, guys, only in my dreams.  This tune is a bit more repetitive and minimalistic with the riffing, though it works, creating a trance-like backdrop for the vocals to alternate between aggression and contemplation, and there’s once again a really cool psychedelic guitar solo building into a chorus.

The third song, “Long Gone”, brings back the swirling clean tones of the first track, this time more downbeat and drawn out, which really gives them space to breath in and exhale all of their psychedelic goodness.  Suddenly, things pick up into an exotic sounding motif, and we’re off to the proverbial races.  Things get really intense really quickly, with the distortion kicking in along with a wah, which slowly filters the guitar’s tonality from low to high before flowing right into the verse, which follows the same motif and adds the now familiar vocals.  The chorus uses some nice rhythmic and melodic variations, and there’s a section afterwards that uses some sweet syncopation as well.  From their, the song repeats its clean intro, bringing in some tribal style drums a la Neurosis that leads  to another distorted climax and finale.  “New Horizon” starts with a fairly standard, slower doom riff, then shifts into more psychedelic territories with the guitars and vocals, which start out with an eerie chant evoking some cosmic monks on an ergotamine bender.  The initial doom riff kicks back in, and the vocals pick up their typical counterpoint of styles.  It’s a lot like the second song in many respects, more repetitive and trance inducing, though there’s notably a most excellent interplay between the melody of the solo section and the rhythm riff pulsing underneath it in this ascending pattern that echoes many of the themes of the album without speaking a single word.

 

Gold Vinyl

 

They close with “Against And Against”, a song that’s lean and mean from the very start, starting off with a riff that’s right out of The Art Of Self Defense playbook and the album’s most aggressive vocals.  I can dig it.  It breaks done into some of the slowest riffs, punctuated by feedback and weird echoed bubbles of sonic depths yet to be explored.  Things eventually grind to a complete halt in what could be classified as a fake ending, though this is just a tease – they’re not letting you off that easily.  The riffs rehash, then slowly fade out, leaving only the barest of skeletal guitars by the end, buried in murk and reverb.  Once again, this is a tease.  A burst of feedback brings things right back to the forefront.  Big, throbbing riffs and vocal harmonies pave the way for yet another bizarre fade-out, this one punctuated by seething white noise.  It’s an interesting choice for ending an album, and quite an ambitious track.

When all is said and done, this an extremely promising album from a fairly new band.  It’s not just paint by numbers doom – it showcases of a variety of influences and a spectrum of styles, all the while retaining a more modern edge.  Sunnata never disappear down the retro rabbit hole, nor do they consciously ape any other band.  The most apt comparison I could come up with is YOB, though even that analogy falls a little flat for me as well.  It probably has more to do with YOB’s willingness to break the mold and experiment with different sounds and influences more than it has to do with actual similarities in sound.  I’m definitely going to be watching this band with curiosity as they continue to grow, progress, and reach towards the upper empyrean of the doom multiverse….

 

Reviewed By Andy “Ding a ding dang my dang a long ling long” Beresky